Woman sitting on the deck of a Mearth scooter


Electric scooter law in SA prohibits personal electric scooters from riding in public. According to SA law, electric scooters are considered motorised wheeled recreational devices, which are transportation devices that are propelled using electric motors. Since e-scooters are considered motor vehicles, riders must have a license, registration, and insurance. However, electric scooter regulations do not allow electric scooters to be registered as they don’t meet the safety standards according to the Australian Design Rules. Thus, private electric scooters can’t be ridden in public.


Electric scooters can only be ridden on private property. Riders caught using their personal e-scooters on footpaths, roads, and public spaces will be fined for driving unregistered and uninsured vehicles. 


However, SA has allowed e-scooter trials in some parts of the state. Locals and tourists may only ride an electric scooter from an approved operator and within an e-scooter trial area. Road-legal electric scooters may be ridden in Adelaide and North Adelaide, along the Coastal Park Trail, and within the City of Norwood, Payneham and St Peters.


Riders of shared e-scooters are required to follow electric scooter road rules. These include:

  • Riders must be at least 18 years of age.
  • Riders must wear an approved and fitted helmet.
  • Riders may ride on footpaths and shared paths unless it is prohibited.
  • Riders may only ride on the road when crossing or to avoid obstacles. If travelling on a road, riders must travel less than 50m, keep to the left, and obey traffic signals.
  • Riders must NOT ride on a road with a dividing line or median strip, a speed limit of over 50 km/h, and a one-way road with more than one marked lane. Riders may also not travel on prohibited roads.
  • Shared e-scooter riders must not ride on bike and bus lanes.
  • Riders must use a warning device, such as a bell or horn, to avoid danger.
  • Riders must ride safely and responsibly with consideration for other people.
  • Riders must use white front light and red rear light when riding at night or in harsh conditions.
  • Riders must not exceed 15 km/h.
  • Riders must not ride abreast.
  • Riders must not carry passengers.
  • Riders must not drive under the influence of alcohol or drugs.
  • Riders must not use their mobile phone while riding.
  • Riders must not carry their scooter on public transport.

  • The local council is set to monitor and evaluate the e-scooter trials. For more information on electric scooter laws in SA, please check this full guide on motorised scooters and e-scooter trials in SA.


    Tips to ride an electric scooter safely and responsibly

    When riding shared electric scooters in SA, always keep the following tips and mind to keep you and others safe from accidents.

    1. Check the condition of your electric scooter

    Whether you are riding a private or shared electric scooter, always check the condition of your electric scooter before riding. Make sure to check on the battery level, tyre pressure, tyre condition, brakes, accelerator, and the rest of the components. Knowing that everything is in top shape will ensure a safe ride without any technical or mechanical problems. To help you when inspecting an e-scooter, here’s an electric scooter safety checklist.


    2. Wear proper protective gear

    As with other states and territories, e-scooter law in SA also requires riders to wear a fitted and approved helmet. However, riders may wear more protection to minimise injuries in case of falling or collisions. Riders may wear gloves, elbow and knee pads, and eye protection. Riders should also wear reflective clothing or install lights on their helmets when riding at night. This will make riders more visible to pedestrians and other vehicles.


    3. Stay alert and keep your eyes on the road

    It’s easy for the eye to wander around while riding a vehicle. However, try to avoid this and keep your eyes and focus on the road. If riders don’t pay attention to where they are going, they are at risk of running into bumps or obstacles or colliding with pedestrians. It’s also important to follow road rules and be mindful of your surroundings. Slow down on crossroads, corners, and humps, and try not to ride near the speed limit.


    Why it’s time to use an electric scooter

    1. Use e-scooters as a first and last-mile solution

    The first and last-mile problem refers to the distance between your home and the nearest public transportation. Often, this range is too far to walk and too near to use a private car. However, micro-mobile transportations like e-scooters offer a lightweight, efficient, and eco-friendly solution to this problem.


    2. Save on transportation costs

    Shared electric scooters offer almost the same cost as public transportation, but it is sometimes cheaper, depending on your ride. Usually shared e-scooters cost a dollar to unlock the e-scooter and around $0.40 per minute to ride. So, a 10-minute ride only costs $5. You not only save money but also get to your destination faster since you don’t have to sit and wait in traffic.


    3. Say goodbye to parking

    Electric scooters are light and compact, making them easy to fold and store. Personal electric scooters can be brought inside your home and stored within small spaces. As for shared e-scooters, they can be parked anywhere as long as they don’t obstruct paths. Some operators also offer designated parking stations for more convenient parking. Regardless, you don’t have to worry about parking anymore when riding e-scooters.


    Electric Scooter Laws in Australia


    Each state and territory in Australia has a different set of rules and regulations pertaining to the usage of e-scooters(including where e-scooters can legally be used and whether these products need to be registered with the relevant road traffic authority). Any user of this product must ensure that that they check and abide by their local by-laws and use responsibly. Ride with caution and always wear a helmet and protective gear when riding your Mearth e-scooter. Click here to learn more about E-scooter regulations in your state.


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    By Jonathan Vicente

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