Electric scooter laws in Australia vary from state to state. Each state has their own set of laws and regulations which determines how you can use electric scooters in that region. Here are the rules for each state:

E-Scooter Laws in Queensland:

In Queensland, riding an electric scooter on public roads and footpaths are permitted. 

However, there are some rules that riders must follow:

  • Helmets must be worn
  • Children under 12 cannot ride, and riders up to 16 must be supervised by an adult.
  • Riders must give way to pedestrians
  • Speed limit to 25km/h

Riders may be fined up to $130 if they break the rules

E-Scooter Laws in Victoria:

Electric scooters that are limited to less than 200w in power output and capable of speeds below 10km/h are permitted for use on public roads and footpaths.

We are expecting the Victorian state government to update their transport legislation to allow faster and more powerful scooters later this year.

E-Scooter Laws in ACT:

Currently, electric scooters cannot be ridden on public roads and footpaths in the ACT.

The ACT government has expressed interest in ‘tweaking’ their current electric scooter laws to allow private riders and e-scooter sharing services such as lime operate.

E-Scooter Laws in NSW:

Currently, in NSW riding an electric scooter on public roads and footpaths are not allowed. However, it is permitted on private grounds.

There are location specific trial programs for electric scooters in both Manly and Bondi. The state government has formed an e-scooter working group aimed to offer trial programs and help determine the fate of e-scooters in the region. E-scooter sharing company Lime has formed a campaign asking members to lobby the government to start a trial for shared scooters.

Given this, we are expecting that the NSW transport minister will revise the laws to keep up with the new form of city transportation as done by Queensland.

For more information:

https://roadsafety.transport.nsw.gov.au/stayingsafe/pedestrians/skateboardsfootscootersandrollerblades/index.html

E-Scooter Laws in SA:

Currently, in South Australia riding an electric scooter on public roads and footpaths are not allowed. However, riding is allowed on private grounds.

The South Australia state government will update their transport legislation to allow e-scooters on public grounds in the near future. However, recently Lime was given permission to bring 500 e-scooters to Adelaide’s CBD for a trial period. Upon the success of this trial, we could be seeing e-scooters on the roads of Adelaide.

E-Scooter Laws in WA:

Currently, in Western Australia riding an electric scooter on public roads and footpaths are not allowed. However, riding is permitted on private grounds.

Western Australia state government will update their transport legislation to allow e-scooters on public grounds. The state government have plans for to try electric scooters in Western Australia by the shared scooter share service, Lime.

E-Scooter Laws in NT:

Electric scooters that are limited to less than 200w in power output and capable speeds below 10km/h are permitted for use on public roads and footpaths. Scooters exceeding this power and speed will require registration. 

We are expecting the Northern Territory state government to update their transport legislation to allow faster and more powerful scooters later this year, following the footsteps of Queensland. 

For more information:

https://nt.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0006/374352/v56-motorised-foot-scooters-and-power-assisted-cycles.pdf

E-Scooter Laws in TAS:

Electric scooters that are limited to less than 200w in power output for use on public roads and footpaths. Scooters exceeding this power and speed will require registration.

Electric scooters are still on a testing phase for most states here in Australia. But they have gained traction over the past few months. With the convenience of electric scooters and electric bikes, it’s only a matter of time until we see more people using these vehicles and the laws will change to follow suit. The future looks bright.

If you’re still unsure of the laws in your state or region, don’t hesitate to reach out to us for more information.

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